Vexen Crabtree 2015

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Vexen Crabtree's Live Journal

Sociology, Theology, Anti-Religion and Exploration: Forcing Humanity Forwards


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Vexen Crabtree 2015
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Notes (Women & Church Telegraph article)

Notes on article:

The Daily Telegraph, 2004 Mar 13, Sat, p14
"Women Priests still held back after 10 years"
Article by Jonathan Petre.

Women make up 1/5th of Church of England Clergy. 10th anniversary of first female ordinations in Bristol Cathedral (1994 Mar 12, 32 original ordinations) "the first of a wave of about 1,200 over the following month"

"But few are in superior posts and they remain barred from the top rungs of the hierarchy [...]. Moreover, their simmering resentment at the Act of Synod, the compromise which allows "flying bishops" to oversee traditionalist parishes, is boiling over."

"the Act [has] been used to 'undermine women priests, promote the idea that discrimination against women is acceptable and create a "church within a church" for sexist clergy."

Female Leicester Cathedral Dean, the Very Rev Vivienne Faull, tipped to be the first ordained Bishop, wrote about a Queen's Party she attended:

"I was repeatedly asked by other guests when are you going to become a bishop? [...] I had to explain that it is illegal [...] The look of horror on their faces... few women from other walks of life are aware of the constraints on women in the Church"

The Very Rev Vivienne Faull is publishing a report on the theological implications of women bishops.

Notes:

It is common knowledge that Christian Churches, and other Abrahamic religions (including Judiasm and Islam) have poor human rights records even including liberal wings such as the Church of England. But still the depth of the injustice to women, gays (and even blacks, still) shocks the otherwise-educated classes.

Partially in Britain this shock is because British culture accepts female equality, whereas sizablle (and growing) portions of Christian culture does not. The shock also arises because, as pointed out in my main essay on Religion in Britain, all groups in Britain educated or not, working or not, show a comprehensive lack of experience and knowledge of even the basic facts about Christianity and religion in general.

This highlights an eternal question and heated debate; are introlerant people drawn to religion because they can get away with intolerance within it's traditionalist culture, or, does (Abrahamic) religion simply bring out the worst in some people?

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"It took the Church of England 20 years of debate and threats of a schism to agree to the ordination of women priests"
http://www.guardian.co.uk/religion/Story/0,2763,1161746,00.html

"The Roman Catholic Church has quietly taken a step forward for women's equality, naming the first female theologians as Vatican consultants"
http://www.guardian.co.uk/religion/Story/0,2763,1165122,00.html

Crisis warning on women bishops. Archbishop of York inflames row over female ordination.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/religion/Story/0,2763,1161677,00.html

(Deleted comment)
If you read the Bible, you'll find that many tolerant attitudes are incompatible with the letter of the law, and as such many traditionalist and legalistic forms of Christianity cannot get with the time and remain true to their reading of the Bible.

A more modern reading of the Bible, where we simply say that "love" overrides particular laws that we now disagree with as the authors did not know enough science and were in a different culture, it is said that much of it is culturally irrelevant to us and can be ignored. But this means you're being pretty arbitrary with what in the Bible you decide to read literally and what you override with modern morality... so there's no easy way to reconcile what the Bible says, and what we know to be moral.

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