2005

vexen

Vexen Crabtree's Live Journal

Sociology, Theology, Anti-Religion and Exploration: Forcing Humanity Forwards


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2005
vexen

If God was a rich man...

If God was a rich man..., a stupid metaphor that someone sent me. Emotional manipulation like this only works on immature, impressionistic, moronic imbeciles. I'm going to collect some of these stupid comparisons, just out of anger that they exist at all.

The emailer gave his email address as rufflychux@hotmail.com

Re: If God was a Richman

vexen

2006-04-28 08:48 am (UTC)

2. It's not that logic "doesn't work" with God, but that the idea of God is inherently illogical.

3. Take it literally if you want.

4. Heaven is a place of perfection, and it states multiple times in the Bible that anyone 'with God' is sinless - this was one of St Pauls' and the Gnostic Christians main points. Heaven is to be in the presence of God, which is a perfect and sinless place. I bet you can't find a single Biblical passage that even hints that it is Biblical to say there is evil in heaven.

My point is: God created evil, yet evil is not required for free will. God could only create evil and suffering if it was not a benevolent God. Therefore, because of the existence of evil, God must be evil or at least not-good. This is the argument of Epicurus and early Roman philosophers, and over 2000 years it has remained the single biggest problem with saying that there is a moral or good god.

5. Uh oh.

6. If God created everything, if God is the creator god, then yes, God created evil along with every other thing, emotion, cause-and-effect chain, etc. Even if you said that "man" created evil, then we would only be able to create it if God first made "evil" a thing that could possibly exist. God must have created it in order for it to be a possible thing.

7. Exactamundo! Although historically there has been uncertainty as to exactly what the unforgiveable sin is.

8. If God was "absolutely" good, beyond any subjective morals or relativism, then God would never appear to be bad from any point of view.


Punishment is impossible from a perfectly good and loving god, especially one that has infinite mercy and compassion: God would give everyone perfect happiness whether they deserved it or not, and wouldn't need to punish anyone first. The parable of the lost sheep in Matthew and of the lost coin in Luke (I think) both state that God gives the utmost reward to people who don't deserve it, without punishing them. This is logical. It is illogical to say that a perfect god could punish anything for any reason.

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